V-Ray – Underwater rendering tip

Software:
3ds max 2019 | V-Ray Next

I decided to do some test renders for an underwater swimming pool scene with 3ds max and V-Ray,
And happily found out that my initial geeky academic approach to the subject was actually outdated and unnecessary.
> look down at the bottom for the correct sample renders.

In this example there is a VRaySun & VRaySky for the daylight render setup and a Caustics calculation to create the light lensing effects on the under water surfaces.

The wrong way:
Having ancient habits in the subject,
I first flipped the water\air surface’s normals so they’ll point down into the water (towards the camera), And set the water material’s IOR to 0.75 ( 1 / 1.333 ) so instead of being an “air to water” material, it will become a “water to air” material.
This produced a non realistic result.
Viewed from underwater, the air surface should have a very dominant mirror reflection at most angles.Untitled-1.jpg

 

The Correct Way:
It seems that in V-Ray nothing special should be setup in terms of the water material.
You don’t have to create a special water-to-air material like I thought at first.
Its a regular water material, and the water surface is facing upwards like it should,
And when the camera is underwater it renders the water surface correctly as an air surface from withing the water.

The pool water material setup:
Note that Affect Shadows is turned off so the surface will generate caustics and not fake transparent shadows, and that Reflect on back side is turned on to produce more detailed reflections.
mat.jpg

This produced the following result in which the reflection/refraction look correct but the water is still too simple:Untitled-2.jpg

Improved wave deformation for the water surface, added detail using a Noise bump in the water material and a sense of depth with Volumetric Fog:Untitled-4.jpg

Finally remembered to activate Reflect on back side at the water material to add more realistic reflection detail, some basic contrast in the V-Ray VFB,
And a shark because I couldn’t help it…. 😀
Untitled-6.jpg

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V-Ray Next’s PBR’ness

Software:
3ds max 2019 | V-Ray Next

A quick test of V-Ray Next‘s PBR workflow,
Namely designing materials while previewing them using V-Ray,
Defining the material properties using the new (to V-Ray) Metalness attribute, and using Roughness rather than Glossiness, shows good results IMO.

Results are generally consistent through Blender & Cycles, Maya & Arnold, and UE4.

Untitled-1.jpgUntitled-3

Untitled-4

Untitled-2

 

Related Posts:

  1. V-Ray Next – Metalness
  2. Metal In UE4
  3. Fresnel Reflections

Fresnel Reflections

What we refer to in CG by the term “Fresnel Effect” or “Fresnel Reflections”, is the way Specular Reflection intensity changes according to light \ surface incident angle, and it is a basic optical property surfaces.

Specular reflection intensity changes according to light incident angle, and behaves almost like a perfect mirror at grazing view angle.
The reason we call this natural reflection behavior “Fresnel Effect” or “Fresnel Reflection” is that the equations describing the how reflection intensity changes according to incident angle were invented by the French Physicist Augustin-Jean Fresnel, and in early CG days, not all systems knew how to calculate natural reflections or reflections at all for that matter. So in CG we ended up treating this as something special, when in fact it’s not special in nature, it was just special in the early days of ray-tracing.

When rendering Fresnel Reflections, the reflection intensity isn’t determined by a linear blending percent like mixing a layer.
It’s determined by a factor called “Refractive Index” or “Index Of Refraction” i.e. IOR.
The IOR value is derived from the physical material’s density, which is the key factor determining both reflection intensity and refraction amount.

Examples of some physical IOR values*:
Air (vacuum): 1.0
Water: 1.33
Glass: 1.52
Diamond: 2.417
* Physical values differ between different measurements and samples of materials so you might see differences between different data sources.

FResnel_Off

This ball is rendered without “Fresnel Reflections”.
Its Specular reflection is blended consistently at 50% over the diffuse color (reflection), not affected by the light/view incident angle.
The result looks wrong for a natural material. It may look like a dielectric material (non metal) that’s coated with a silvery coating, but it can’t look correctly like glossy plastic or glass.

FResnel_On

This ball is rendered with “Fresnel Reflections”.
The reflections look natural for a dielectric material (non metal), because they are dim at perpendicular incident angle and intense at grazing view angle, hence seen mostly at the sides of the ball accentuating its contour.

Theoretically Specular Reflection for all types of materials should be calculated using what we refer to in CG by the term “Complex Fresnel”, that is reflection equations that take into account both the Refractive Index (IOR) and Extinction Coefficient for 3 primary colors (spectrum wave lengths).
*Complex fresnel component values for different materials can be found on https://refractiveindex.info/.
In practice, for Dielectric materials (non metals), most common production rendering systems use what we refer to in CG by the term “Simple Fresnel” or “Simple IOR”, that is calculating the reflection for all 3 primary colors using a single Refractive Index value, which is the Refractive index of the Green primary color.
This method has proven itself to be very efficient for rendering non-metallic surfaces (dielectric materials).
Rendering metallic reflection using complex IOR produces the most realistic color and reflection* for metals.
*In metallic surfaces the color is the reflection color itself and not a separate Diffuse component.
Some rendering systems like Arnold 5 for example have implemented a general form* of Complex IOR into their physical surface shader, Complex IOR reflection can also be rendered via OSL shaders that can be found on the web (or written..).
*I’m using the term ‘general form’ because these implementations don’t include input for Complex IOR values but just a general metallic reflection curve, that interpolates manual color selection.
Popular useful cheats for mimicking metallic reflection without complex IOR are to set a very high (non physical) simple IOR value, like 15 to 30 which forces the Fresnel reflection to become more metal-like, or turn Fresnel reflection completely off, turning the specular reflection into a perfect mirror reflection, or create a custom reflection/angle curve/ramp that produces the effect of the metallic reflection color and intensity changing by incident angle, see example here.

In many popular production renderers, the physical surface shader uses a single IOR parameter. Some rendering systems allow using 2 different IOR parameters, one for calculating reflections and the other for calculating Refraction.
* physically correct dielectric materials should be defined with the same IOR value for both reflections and refraction. using different IOR values for reflection and refraction allows useful cheats like creating transparent a material that is modeled without any thickness or defining a transparent glass that has silver reflective coating like sunglasses sometimes have.

Notes:

  1. IOR lists on the web, that display only simple IOR values like this list, are not valid for metals, and produce wrong results.
    *Using simple IOR values for dielectric materials however is very efficient.
  2. There are parts in the CG industry where in daily slang language, the term “Fresnel” is used to refer to any shading effect that is view-angle dependent,
    Usually referring to the shading properties appearing at the “sides” or contours of the model.
  3. There are some CG systems that use the term Fresnel to refer to a simple linear or non-linear incident angle blending effect, that should actually be called “Facing ratio” or “Perpendicular-Parallel” blending (falloff).
    This is wrong because IOR based Fresnel reflection intensity produces a specific physical Reflection intensity/view angle function curve, and not just a linear or simple power function.
    See example in UE4’s Fresnel node.

Related:

  1. V-Ray Next’s new metallic material option.
  2. Creating a rich metallic shader in UE4.
  3. Complex Fresnel Texture for Cycles.

IES Lighting in CG

IES stands for Illuminating Engineering Society, it is the organization responsible for creating and maintaining industrial standards for design and manufacturing of artificial light sources.

In 3D rendering, an IES file or “photo-metric file” is a text file containing a physical description of a light source’s beam spread , pattern and intensity, allowing for faithful depiction of the light source in 3D renders.
Most modern 3D rendering software support IES lights, that is allow loading IES files into the software and lighting the 3D scene using the light source described in the IES file.

Lighting manufacturers make measurements of their light fixture model’s physical light output and create IES files available for download on their websites.
This allows architects, lighting designers, and interior designers to download the files and realistically visualize the light sources effect on their projects.

CG artists use IES lights to add realistic spotlight beam patterns to their renderings and animations, such that can’t be created using regular simple 3D light sources.

Examples of IES lights rendered with V-Ray for 3ds max:

IES

Related:
IES Spotlights for Blender & Cycles

Cycles – Nested Refractive Volumes

Software:
Blender 2.79 | Cycles Renderer

When it comes to rendering nested refractive volumes, like a glass containing a beverage, the way to set it up in Cycles is common to many modern ray-tracers.
The touching bodies of refractive material like glass and liquid must overlap each other slightly so that rays being traced “meet” the right surface without having surfaces touching and causing “Z fighting” artifacts.

Transparencies_Air_Bubbles-01

When the render includes volumetric shading, like Volume Absorption (sometimes referred to as “fog”), the meshes must be set-up in a certain way for Cycles to interpret the volumes properly.

Intersecting volumes like a beverage glass and liquid must be separate objects to be rendered correctly. When joined into one mesh the renderer doesn’t treat the different volumes separately even though they have different shaders.
And the result is that the volume (depth) of the inner volume is calculated as just the depth on the intersection (the overlap) of the volumes.
In this example the wine can’t be rendered correctly when the glass and liquid meshes are joined.
The wine liquid doesn’t get it’s deep color because the renderer “thinks” it’s very thin.

Untitled-1.jpg

When the meshes are separated the renderer interprets the wines volume correctly and the Volume Absorption shader produces the right color:

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Setting up cavities within a volume like air bubbles, is similar to many other modern ray-tracers. You just have to create inner meshes that have flipped normals facing inwards, so air bubbles within the wine don’t need to have “air” material, they have the same wine shader, but have their faces flipped.

Note that in this case, it’s the other way around from the previous example.
If the bubble meshes are separate from the liquid mesh the renderer doesn’t interpret them as holes in the liquid volume, and produces an incorrect result:

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When the bubble meshes are joined to the liquid mesh, the volume is interpreted correctly:

Untitled-4.jpg

In short:
For these refractive volumetric effects to be rendered correctly in Cycles,
Surfaces of the same material volume must be joined to one mesh, and separated from meshes belonging to different material volumes.
* This may sound trivial, but it’s not. there are rendering systems in which only the surface shader determines volume interpretation and that has advantages like the convenience to aninate bubbles as separate objects from the liquid itself or the ability to join a glass bottle with the liquid into one mesh model.

Arnold for Maya refractive caustics

Software:
Maya 2018 | Arnold 5

An account of the drastic measures that need to be taken in order to ‘persuade’ Arnold for Maya to render refractive caustics.

  1. In the refractive object’s shape attributes,
    Under ‘Arnold’, ‘Opaque’ must remain checked.
    * This is unintuitive but when refractive caustics are calculated there is no need for transparent shadows. the caustics pattern is in fact the light refracting through the object.
  2. The refractive object’s aiStandardSurface shader must have it’s Transmission layer active.
    For a colored refractive object, Transmission Weight should be 1.0,
    A color should be selected, and the density of the color should be controlled with the Depth attribute (higher values make the color less dens).
    In the shader’s advance attributes, check ‘Caustics’.
    In the shader’s Specular layer, set the IOR to match your material.
    * The default of 1.52 is the IOR for glass, and water would be IOR 1.33 for example.
  3. For refractive caustics to be rendered, the light source must be an Arnold Mesh Light,
    And in its shape attributes, under Light Attributes ‘Light Visible’ must be checked.
  4. In many cases, in order for the caustics pattern’s intensity to be correct,
    The ‘Indirect Clamp Value’ must be raised in Render Settings > Arnold Renderer, under Clamping.
  5. In some cases the Transmission value under Ray Depth in Render Settings > Arnold Renderer must be increased for the caustics to render properly.
    * Light simulation must be able refract through all the relevant surfaces.
  6. To increase the caustics render quality, the number of Diffuse samples must be raised in Render Settings > Arnold Renderer.
    * This may be unintuitive, but the caustics pattern is actually part of the Diffuse rendering of the surface upon which the caustics are appearing.

That’s it!
Hope you find this useful 🙂

Arnold_Coustics_AArnold_Coustics_BArnold_Coustics_C